Barrie Writers' Club

Official Page

I love Irish


Leave a comment

St. Patrick’s Day Writing Prompts!

Writing Prompts!

  1. Make a list of pros and cons of being a leprechaun
  2. Write an essay about everything you know about Ireland.
  3. Write an essay about why someone should visit Ireland. Persuade your audience using Rhetoric with either: Logos, Pathos or Ethos.
  4. “I woke up the day after St. Patrick’s Day and found myself in…”
  5. “At the end of the rainbow, I didn’t find a pot of gold but I did find…”
  6. Write about your favorite lucky charm and why it’s your favorite or who may have stolen it😉
  7. Research and write an essay about St. Patrick.
  8. Research and write an essay about Niall of the Nine Hostages, a high Irish king and warlord.
  9. Write a short story, poem or limerick about St. Patrick and/or Niall of the Nine Hostages.
  10. Watch this music video, use it as inspiration to write your very own Irish drinking song🙂

House Of Pain – Jump Around – Rhino Records

~Sara


Leave a comment

Free Workshop on getting published

Courtesy of Damian Lopes:

Barrie’s Culture Department is hosting a free workshop on how to get published on 18 May 2016. Topics range from placing pieces in magazines and journals, all the way to landing an agent and book contract, with some self-publishing, zine and micro press publishing thrown in. Though free, registration is required.

Join Alana Wilcox of Coach House Books, Bruce Meyer and me on 18 May!

Follow the link for more details: http://www.damianlopes.com/news/barrie-workshop-how-to-get-published-18-may/


Leave a comment

A Guide to Reading Poetry

Poetry at the Library

Mark Yakich over at The Atlantic has a great guide for people anxious about reading and evaluating poetry. Here’s a snippet:

Here are 20 modest proposals toward rethinking the act of reading a poem.


1. Dispel the notion that reading poetry is going to dramatically change your life. Your life is continually changing; most of the time you’re simply too busy to pay enough attention to it. Poems ask you to pay attention—that’s all.

2. When you read a poem, especially a poem not meant to be a “spoken word” poem, always read it out loud. (Never mind what they said in grammar school—to subvocalize so that you won’t bother your peers.) Your ear will pick up more than your head will allow. That is, the ear will tell the mind what to think.

Click here to read the full guide or visit: http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/11/how-to-read-poetry-a-step-by-step-guide/380657/

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 70 other followers